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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
to richard nixon. and richard nixon vetoed it even though it passed with lots of republican votes. president nixon said the idea of preschool for everyone had quote, family-weakening implications. he said quote, the child development envisioned in this legislation would be truly a long leap into the dark for the united states government and the american people. a long leap into the dark. 40 years after president nixon said no to preschool for all american kids with the weird leaping in the dark analogy, president obama is trying to bring a version of that idea back with a plan for early education for all americans. but this time the president has wind in his sails blowing in from an unlikely source. it's blowing in from a really, really red state. from maybe the reddest of all red states. this is how oklahoma voted in 2012. mitt romney swept every county. in 2008 john mccain swept every county. in 2004 george bush swept every county. oklahoma is the reddest place we've got in america. and republicans, you may have heard, like to think that they do not think much of the policy ideas of barack
or republican. i voted for richard nixon, ronald reagan, but after the george bush fiasco, the republicans will not give back the tax cuts that george bush's friends liked and they still like thim. they want to get rid of things people need like social security and medicare. host: paul is a republican. caller: good morning. favorite is george bush. host: george w. or george h. w.? caller: george w. bush. host: why? out, iot going to find guess. let's go to democratic caller in iowa. caller: good morning. my favorite is john f. kennedy. he was brilliant. when he gave his inaugural address, he started the peace corps and he brought young kids to help out with the country. he and his brothers were for the poor. it was not just for the rich. he's my favorite. thank you. host: we will keep getting your thoughts on your favorite president throughout the first part of the morning. let me give you some other headlines in the papers. the new york times front page -- next to that is the story about obama's plan for citizenship that was put out on saturday. it says none of the 11 million illegal immi
and richard nixon vetoed that legislation. so congress can do it in 1971. they sure as hell can do it in 2013 and they should. what do you think. 1-866-55-press. >> announcer: this is the "full court press." the "bill press show" live on your radio and on current tv. for true stories. with award winning documentaries that take you inside the headlines. real, gripping, current. documentaries... on current tv. irene, drop the itch. we dropped the itch, you can too. maximum strength scalpicinĀ® is not a shampoo so you can stop intense itch fast, wherever you are. i dropped the itch. drop the itch with scalpicinĀ®. alright, in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'm going to be the first one to call them out. they can question whether i'm right, but i think that the audience gets that this guy, to the best of his ability, is trying to look out
was suburbanites turned on the democrats and we got richard nixon. we can prematurely declare these things sometimes. a cautionary note. >> goldie, the piece says today's gop is taking its cues from john calhoun and his belief in nullification. the idea that states can ignore federal law. he writes it's not a coincidence that the resurgence of nullification is happening while our first african-american president is in office. how du the gop reach out to a broader demographic when we see how it's treated this nation's first black president? >> that is the grand irony but the truth of the matter is they're not only hearkening back to calhoun, but they're playing the script of kevin phillips who was the chief architect of the southern strategy. this was the chaining together of those southern confederate states, those 11 states, with what was happening out west and up through the midwest, and he said at the time we can frankly do without manhattan. we can do without new york. we can do without chicago. we can do without all these major city that is were largely black and brown. the republican
. ronald reagan averaged 40 min tonight's his state of the union and richard nixon averaged 35 minutes. >> woodruff: that counts applause. >> that counts applause. i think he would endear himself to the nation if he just stood up and said i'm going to... >> that should be a voting issue all by itself. who do you vote for? >> woodruff: are you saying there's been a lack of urgency coming out of the white house? >> i think there's a lot of important issues that they've emphasized. gun control or immigration or training and research. but i mean what is it that comes out that the president says this is what defines my presidency? david is right. he was far more assertive, in his inaugural address than he was in his first term. i guess we expect that to continue. is there an olive branch offered? i mean, is there a sense or is there going to be the republicans have lost five of the last six elections in the popular vote. five of the last elections they lost senate seats. they lost the house races by 1.3 million even though they only lost eight seats. they're a party... and the republicans f
president gee w. bush. in 1974, some inadvertent foreshadowing from president richard nixon -- >> i urge the congress to join me in mounting a major new effort to replace the discredited president welfare system. >> reporter: in 2000, president clinton perhaps revealing his true political colors. >> tonight i ask you to support new funding for the following things, to make american communities more liberal -- livable. >> reporter: there was always loud applause, but also head shaking, stoney silence and the supreme example of disapproval when president obama criticized a campaign finance ruling, a full out mouthing of not true from supreme court justice samuel alito. for every nightmare, there is a dream. the forever dreamy tom brady, once in the stands for george w. bush. on the subject of dreams and nightmares, guess which one john mccain was having in 2007? a big yawn from harry reid in 2010. and for vice president biden, perhaps a moment of meditation in 2011. mr. biden's hands have their very own chapter in the state of the union history book. so much sitting and standing and clappi
, whether it was jerry ford, whether it was richard nixon, whether it was jimmy carter with the rescue mission, failed rescue mission of the diplomats in tehran or ronald reagan with grenada. never has a president just said, thanks very much. let me know later what happens. ding. puts the phone down. martha: panetta suggested that was not the way he was. that the president was very much wanted to know what was going on. when he asked did he call you back? did he get it touch with you, the answer to that was no. we also know we had forces in italy were told, actually, don't take off just yet. you need to change out of uniform if you're going to be involved in this in any way. in the end they were not involved in any way. so it goes to the bigger question again why? why would the president not want to step in and help these people? >> what i heard they didn't want a black hawk down incident. any use of american forces before an american election. they could have a situation where there were even more american casualties, american hostage, something would have happened. i think the other
about. richard nixon, who was eisenhower's vice president, said that eisenhower was more complicated and devious than most people realize, and then nixon said i mean devious in the best sense of the word. [laughter] now, ike was human. the stress did get to him. he had a heart attack in 1955, a stroke in 1957, chronic stomach problems, a stomach operation in 1956. one of the most useful records of ike's life is the diary that was kept by his personal doctor, howard snyder. and the diary's very explicit about the medications and his mood. they were worried about his mood, because they were afraid that high blood pressure and that he would pop a cork, and it would give him another heart attack. so the doctors were always telling eisenhower not to worry so much, and he would say just what do you think this job is? of course he worried. he had a lot to worry about. and he occasionally erupted. he threw his golf club at his doctor and almost broke his leg, not exactly great sportsmanship, but it was on the same day that eisenhower was deciding whether or whether or not to do a u2 flight o
of president richard nixon. "washington journal" continues. host: bob schoshinski is joining us of the ftc. credit ratings agency -- credit rating agencies, the first of their kind -- what is that? guest: this is a report by that imposed certain responsibilities for certain credit reporting agencies. for instance, the credit reporting act requires credit reporting agencies to have procedures to ensure maximum possible accuracy of the information the report. it gives consumers the right to check their credit report and point out any inaccuracies that are in them and dispute them with the credit reporting agencies. it requires the agency's to investigate those disputes. in 2003 when congress amended the act, they said to the ftc, who is one of the agencies that enforces the act, we would like to see a report on the accuracy of credit reports. over the course of 10 years, the commission has engaged in this study to look at credit reports and determine the accuracy. it is unique because it follows the process all the way -- all the way through, from the consumer looking at the credit report, t
hero, eisenhower, the soldier of democracy. and the purely pragmatic political guy, richard nixon, who was essentially forced on eisenhower's ticket by party regulars. and eisenhower was wary of nixon, but also realized he had great political strengths. nixon knew or learned eventually that eisenhower was actually an extraordinary political leader. each learned something from the other. and nixon never quite got out from eisenhower's shadow. there's a great moment in the 1968 republican convention when nixon, at last, you know, is going to be -- now, he'd run in 1960 and lost. here's his chance to win. and what does he say? let's win it for ike. can't get away from ike. >> how about what ike said about nixon in '68, when they asked him about, name one important decision that dick nixon had any input in, and he said, i'll have to get back to you. >> exactly! >> give me a week. >> that was actually 1960, when nixon had been vice president. >> '60, yeah. >> yeah, joe writes, ike and dick is a highly engrossing political narrative that skillfully takes the reader through the twisted develo
timothy naftali.he was the director of the richard nixon potential library and museum from 2007 until 2011. >> when you did the 149, peoplee who serve in the nixon administration, how did you raise the money to do that? andhey had buyer's remorse a group of alumni of the nixon administration who worked on the domestic side rallied and raise a lot of money for this program. i received contributions from donald rumsfeld. i believe dick cheney. i think paul o'neill provided some funding. member people. the fault of the domestic side of the head ministration hasn't received the b.j. of the administration hasn't received -- the domestic side of the administration has not received that much attention. for the watergate interviews, i used the trust fund. i was very conservative about the way i used the money. the library received one head- one half of all of the ticket money that came into the library card -- one half of the ticket money that came into the library. that money was our trust fund. i used the money for public programming because the nixon foundation shut down all funding. normally,
richard nixon in the 1970's, overwhelming support by the senate and died on the president's death. this isn't the first time that the president is thinking of some sort of bold plan in his second term to try to do this, but it's at a heavy, heavy cost and the benefit is the question. we have a 48-year-old experiment that may it will us something about whether or not this will work, it's called head start. we've spent untold billions on head start since the johnson administration received more publicity, good publicity than any other federal program and the results are in. no long-term benefit to head start. now, why is that? i'm not against head start on principle. why hasn't it worked? shouldn't we figure it out before we mandate for everyone. >> you're talking the health and human services, while it helps them become more, kindergarten through third grade shows no benefit. as opposed to the control group and for what the president is proposing, 98 billion dollars over ten years, again, i think that people might be willing to pay that if it showed what the president was promising
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)